Splits and boards cracking up the middle

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Q: I just had 890 sq. feet of A——— Hardwood floor installed in my house. They delivered it and started install the same day. The workers installed all 890 SQ. in two days.

The same night I notice my socks getting caught on some planks. I then saw many boards that began to crack up the middle and along the sides where joined. There are about 65 splits in a hallway that was 100 inches long by 60 inches wide. I design kitchens and the company that installed does our floors.

He said it was cupping due to a manufacturers defect. He basically told me acclimation was a farce. He agreed to replace all and brought wood to sit for 5 days before new install, just to appease me. Well I found out he was using A——— builders hardwood again. Is it due to poor quality?

It’s not done yet, but the hallway has just one board that’s split. He will replace it. The living room has just one split I can see because the cardboard is covering it while they do other rooms. He said splits are expected because it’s natural wood.

Is this acceptable and do I have to live with wood that splits up the grain of the planks? It’s not even finished yet and I afraid to complain. Am I being a nut case or should I stand up for myself? Please Please Please help me.

A: Absolutely stand up for yourself. The splits will get worse when the finish is applied. If this product is a cheaper grade or even mill run, then yes, you will get that type of thing, but they should be picked out and not installed.

I disagree that acclimating is a farce, but the main issue here seems to be poor product. I wouldn’t have that in my floor and you are right to complain. If I was installing this floor, I would be complaining to the people where I bought it.

Similar Q: We had solid white oak flooring installed, B********, and we have had vertical cracking occurring. Do you think this is a defect in manufacturing? What causes this? Any remedy?

A: I’ve seen this in a couple of white oak floors, about 65% rift and 35% quarter sawn, several such boards had crept into the installation. I would think the best thing to do is replace the affected boards.

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